Reading: Notes 8-12

It has been a while since I have written about my reading, so here are some reading notes from this year’s reading selections with a particular bent towards settings. Just be warned, there are spoilers galore.

Reading Note 8: Tropes in cities. I really love a surprise baby trope as well as a one-night-stand-turn-up-to-your-new-job-to-discover-you-have-already-slept-with-your-new-boss trope. So icky in real life, so absurdly compelling in fiction. The Bachelor’s Baby Surprise is my first Teri Wilson book and I loved her writing style. The premise of the book is that heroine Evangeline Holly goes directly from a bad break up to a one-night stand with Ryan Wilde – a man who has just been voted the hottest bachelor in New York City. Though she gives him the brush off after their hook-up, six weeks later she finds herself employed as a sommelier at the hotel he jointly runs with his cousin. Continue reading

Advertisements

Observations: Notes 18-30

Every few months, I will post a series of observations that I have collected during that time.  I work 4 days a week, study 2 days a week and faceplant every Saturday so it has taken me a while to write . It is unrelated to my previous Observations post. 

Note 18: Mum. My mum was ill for most of 2018. The first half of the year she was constantly in hospital, so in the second half of the year we were all on edge. She wasn’t ill enough to return to hospital, however pneumonia in octogenarians is quite serious. As mum says, every other funeral she attends is due to older people succumbing to pneumonia.

Note 19: Photographs and Mum. I would spend the occasional weekend with my mum, whenever my sister who lives with her was away, as I didn’t want to leave her alone. Mum would just cough uncontrollably for the majority of the time that I was with her. The more she coughed, the more she became distressed. To distract her, I would pull out her albums. Her photographs have aged over the years, but going through them calmed her coughing. She would tell me of her friends, her aunts, the young children in the photos. Continue reading

Library fine by me

I’m a shocking borrower. I am completely unreliable. I forget to renew my books, I forget my due dates, I am constantly late and I am forever paying overdue fines. I like to consider my overdue fines to be my annual donation to the betterment of the local library of which I am a patron.

A few months ago, my mum finally convinced my sisters and me to clean out her garage. This was a mammoth task. I threw out huge, and I mean HUGE amounts of my high school assignments and notes that I stored away over quarter of a century ago. I was impressed by my calligraphy, by my writing style but none of it deserved being kept. Except for this overdue notice:

Overdue Notice

Oh yes! The notice is on embossed paper! I feel so special! Digital overdues can’t compete. There is no mistakening my habitual nature. Here is another one:

Another overdue!

This one is not fancy. It must have only been a first notice. Every time I have overdues I have an excuse as to why I have been late:

– I forgot.

– I didn’t check my mail.

– I lost the due date slip.

– One book slipped under the driver’s seat when I was driving all 45 loans back to the library and the other 44 were on time (well, make that 38 because 6 were from a previous visit).

– My sister borrowed my books and we fought so I couldn’t ask her to return it because a stand off is a freakin’ stand off.

The point is though, that I always return the books. Always. And yes I accrue overdues which I always pay without complaint. A few weeks ago I paid $66. Yep. That is 6 romances just in that one overdue. This time my excuse was that I went away on holiday, lost my charger so I was offgrid for 4 days during which time my overdue notice arrived but I didn’t look at my email until my 13+ items had accrued at $1 a day. I know. A bit “dog ate my homework” but it is true. These overdues were from my uni library which is much more expensive than my local library. Continue reading

On Reading: The Shelf

Every day and throughout the year, I spend a substantial amount of my time reading about reading. From scholarly articles to academic books to chronicles of reading and reading memoirs. I am going to post a series of short observations on the books (and the occasional articles) that I have been reading particularly reflecting on the presence (or lack thereof) of romance fiction, and on how I feel my perceptions of reading aline with the authors.

The Shelf: From LEQ to LES

The Shelf: From LEQ to LES

The Shelf: From LEQ to LES: Adventures in Extreme Reading

by Phyllis Rose

Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2014

In my final post in this On Reading reflections, I explore The Shelf  in which Phyllis Rose decides upon reading every book on a specific fiction shelf (LEQ-LES) in the New York Society Library (NYSL) allowing the library’s arbitrary alphabetised ordering principle (such as I discussed in my last post) to dictate her choices.  I really like the sub sub heading of Adventures in Extreme Reading. Extreme reading, I assumed for the risks the reader takes in serendipitous choice of a shelf that could introduce all manner of wild ideas to the reader. For if this is extreme reading then librarianship by default becomes an extreme profession, one which allows us to venture into readerships unphased and fearless. I also think that this concept of extreme reading is one that we in the library profession take for granted as we have our regulars who often tackle shelves without documenting their progress. Continue reading

Libraries, Greece and the Earth’s Balcony

National Library of Greece

National Library of Greece

A huge thank you to my wonderful aunt Maria Liakou who arranged for me to visit with Mrs Antonia Arohova at the National Library of Greece, Mrs Antonia Arohova for her warm welcome and talking with us about the library and to my fabulous cousin Vaia Rodi-Theologitou who loves walking to the new site every day and for sharing her walk and her enthusiasm for the new library with me.

As one belonging to the Readerly Tribe, there is a certain awe that I feel every time that I set foot in Greece. My skin tingles at the thought that I am walking on the streets where Homer was first committed to the written word. A time where writing and alphabets were a new fangled technology and Old Skoolers tsked tsked at early adapters, bemoaning the loss of memory skills. I love walking past theatres where Euripides and Aristophanes were new releases, where publishing formed its roots, storytelling found its scribes and Western literary canon was born. I love that librarianship was born in Greece, with texts copied and stored and libraries being a reflection of the culture and the products of thought that a great city bore. Despite these feelings I had connecting me to the birth of Western literary tradition, I had never visited the National Library of Greece. Continue reading

Radio and library links

A few weeks ago I was approached by 702Sydney to discuss books and libraries on The Blurb alongside host Linda Mottram and Pages and Pages bookseller Jon Page and in my ever so librarianlicious way I can’t help but share links to all that I mentioned.

I was only a tad nervous before we began having managed to get only a few hours sleep in anticipation for the show but both Linda and Jon put me at ease right from the start. I had a great time, I sprouted Dewey numbers and I even got to crack a corny Shhh! librarian joke – putting dad jokes to shame 🙂

We discussed Paul Ham’s 1914 and 1914 Centenary projects and scanathons run by public libraries. I have included below some links provided to me by lovely @B3rn. I reviewed Laurie Notaro’s The Potty Mouth at the Table and then we got chatting about libraries. I must say that one of my favourite part of the discussion was James Valentine playing library roulette (in libraryland we call this serendipitous searching).

I do blame Laurie Notaro for creeping into my brain and frying it and making me think that mentioning her writing in polite company (read – radio broadcast) is quite okay. So I grabbed my shovel and dug a hole and mentioned her Hogwarts’ porn story on my first (and hopefully, Ms. Notaro, not my last, thanks to your insidious story) ABC radio show. Just no-one tell my mum. Thanks.

Here is my review that I meant to read out:

Laurie NotaroI was excited to see that Laurie Notaro released a new memoir this year. I adored her essays in Autobiography of a Fat Bride and The Idiot Girl and the Flaming Tantrum of Death, at times laughing so hard that I could not continue reading. Her first person, narrative humour is perceptive, self-deprecating and wildly funny. She is like a cross between David Sedaris and Judith Lucy.

The Potty Mouth at the Table is Notaro’s tenth book and she continues her sharp observance of events in her life. She recounts having food poisoning on an 8 hour (vomit) train ride, meeting up with a horny ex-boyfriend, maybe finding a dead hobo in her backyard, as well as her not so diplomatic reaction to her friend’s heinous cupcake tattoo and her pinterest foodie hate. Notaro’s sense of the bizarre shines through her writing and I find myself laughing out loud at her tales and reading aloud excerpts from this book to anyone who will listen.

Here are the rest of the links:

ReadWatchPlay

Read Watch Play – the NSW Readers’ Advisory Group blog and twitterchat #rwpchat held on the last Tuesday night of every month. This month – #egoread, Biographies etc!

http://readwatchplay.wordpress.com/

Centenary Links

Doing our bit: Mosman 1914-1918 – coordinated by Mosman Library

Blog, database, photos, collecting days ‘Scan-a-thon’
http://mosman1914-1918.net/project/ – blog, events

Illawarra Remembers – coordinated by Wollongong City Libraries
http://illawarraremembers.com/
Scan and share days at local libraries: http://illawarraremembers.com/events/

There is also a project at Orange – council project, but library involvement –http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/

See this post: http://mosman1914-1918.net/project/blog/coo-ee-from-nsw-public-libraries

City of Ryde and Kiama also have programs.

Pronouncing Library
It really doesn’t matter how you pronounce it – just use them!

http://tumblr.libraryjournal.com/post/60656742787/amen

Make-up artists in libraries

Zombies at the Tullamore (Australia) Public Libraries

http://www.libraryasincubatorproject.org/?p=8939

Bookmobiles

There is lots of stuff on mobile libraries around so I recommend people google the term. However the Shoalhaven libraries bookmobile does tweet from the road @BookTARDIS.

Deselection process of libraries

Here is an example guideline that libraries use for deselection/weeding of library collections. Different libraries use different criteria

http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=libraryfactsheet&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=75744