Sara Craven oddity

Occasionally, I will read a book that perplexes me. This time it is Sara Craven’s Seduction Never Lies because I am here to tell you that titles do lie because there was nary a hint of seduction in this weird-ass, out of place in Craven’s oeuvre, veddy-veddy English book. But first, to the blurb!


Sara Craven's Seduction Never Lies

Seduction Never Lies

by Sara Craven

Red-faced, red-handed!

Octavia Denison has always known exactly what she wants – that is, until she’s caught in a compromising position by brooding former rock star Jago Marsh. Tavi is mortified, and judging by the gleam in his golden eyes, he’s seen everything – and liked it!

Used to getting what he wants, millionaire Jago is determined to uncover the identity of the mysterious, flame-haired temptress that trespassed on his property…and to satisfy the craving she’s awakened in him. But seducing Tavi proves harder than expected, especially when she’s set on putting as much distance between them as possible! It’s time to up the ante….

So Octavia/Tavy/Tavi (blurb copywriter mistake!) our virginal heroine rides a bicycle around her village, helps out her widowed vicar/reverend/clergy/priest dad (sorry – as I am not CofE I am not sure what the correct term is), she’s a dogsbody at the local school run by Mrs Wilding, a mean-spirited head teacher and Tavy is going out with her son, Patrick Wilding but it is a big hush-hush secret because Patrick is too scared to tell mummy he is dating her. Continue reading

Charlotte Lamb retro comfort read

I am home sick with laryngitis and a chest infection AND a sick, feverish son. For the first few days I attended my own pity party and what is better than a comfort read at a pity party? A Charlotte Lamb angsty romance!

 

Charlotte Lamb The Girl from NowhereThe Girl From Nowhere

c 1981

Suki Black is a successful singer who exudes sensuality on the stage. However off the stage she is sheltered by her manager and his wife, Buddy and Rosie who are more like parents than managers. As the story develops, you discover that Suki was abandoned as a baby and was brought up in a refuge/home/school. Having moved out at 16, she was discovered singing in a bar by Buddy and Rosie at 17 and had been living with them for the past 5 years – working her hard but treating her well and lovingly.

Enter the hero after a kickass performance that opens the book. Joel Harlow is a  smouldering, dictating asshat of a hero who keeps turning up like a bad penny harassing Suki. At no time did I feel any warmth toward industrial magnate, Joel (whose description reminded me of Jamie Arrogance Packer). Continue reading